Priti Patel’s Evil Legislation Passes House of Commons Vote

Having moved to Peebles in 2002, ‘Stooriefit’ Bosco Santimano gives us his own take on what he feels is the hot topic of the day. This week it’s The Nationality and Borders Bill.

The Nationality and Borders Bill – which is a series of regulations spearheaded by Home Secretary Priti Patel has cleared the House of Commons in December 2021. MPs gave the immigration legislation a third reading by 298 votes to 231, meaning it passed to the House of Lords with a majority of 67. At a local level, our own Tory MP David Mundell voted with the government for this bill. The Bill forms part of the UK Government’s plans for a new immigration system.

The government has assured its supporters that this bill will fix the UK’s broken asylum system! According to analysis by the New Statesman, clause nine of the bill could impact up to six million people in Britain – with the majority being ethnic minorities such as those from Black, Asian or Eastern European backgrounds. Clause 9 in the new bill exempts the government from giving notice if it is not “reasonably practicable” to do so, or in the interests of national security, diplomatic relations or is otherwise in the public interest. Under Clause 9 of the Nationality and Borders Bill, the government no longer has to give notice of decision to deprive a person of citizenship if is not “reasonably practicable”. Under international law, everyone has the right to a nationality so people cannot be left stateless. An amendment was tabled by 20 MPs, who sought to scrap the plans in the bill to send people to another country while their asylum claims are processed. The Home Office floated proposals to place asylum seekers offshore in Gibraltar, the Scottish islands and Albania – but all these countries responded with anger and stated that they have no plans to agree to such an arrangement.

A report titled “An inspection of asylum casework” submitted last year by Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration, David Neal tore into Home Secretary Priti Patel’s arguments that appeals to asylum decisions are “a complete merry-go-round and it has been exploited” by immigration lawyers. Alasdair Mackenzie, a barrister who specialises in asylum appeals added that the report “entirely undermines the secretary’s position that the way to deal with the problems in the system is more legislation. What is needed is actually better administration of the system that you’ve got.”
So, what really is all the fuss about? After all its just another major piece of legislation being pushed through parliament by the majority Tory government at Westminster. Covid-19, high unemployment, inflation, health and other issues are being used as a distraction to push thru this bill that will have long-term impact on non-white British citizens.

Terrorism, the refugee and asylum crisis will be used to target individuals that speak out against the government or British state or may be involved overseas in fighting against any injustice that may be construed by the home secretary as being anti British. In this case damaging economic interests of British companies overseas and in conflict hotspots around the world. Four barristers led by the human rights QC Raza Husain claim that the nationality and borders bill, will lead to challenges under international human rights and refugee treaties. Following 95 pages of legal opinion commissioned by the human rights group Freedom From Torture, they conclude: “This bill represents the biggest legal assault on international refugee law ever seen in the UK.

In conclusion this bill if passed will provide any future government/home secretary to decide who is a threat to the UK with no appeals process and the loss of their citizenship. Having acquired my citizenship through all the proper channels, I may now face deportation and the revoking of my citizenship if my columns and social activism upsets local Tories and Unionists. Until that day comes let’s enjoy what little freedoms we all have.

Published in The Peeblesshire News on Friday 21st January 2022