Priti Patel’s Evil Legislation Passes House of Commons Vote

Having moved to Peebles in 2002, ‘Stooriefit’ Bosco Santimano gives us his own take on what he feels is the hot topic of the day. This week it’s The Nationality and Borders Bill.

The Nationality and Borders Bill – which is a series of regulations spearheaded by Home Secretary Priti Patel has cleared the House of Commons in December 2021. MPs gave the immigration legislation a third reading by 298 votes to 231, meaning it passed to the House of Lords with a majority of 67. At a local level, our own Tory MP David Mundell voted with the government for this bill. The Bill forms part of the UK Government’s plans for a new immigration system.

The government has assured its supporters that this bill will fix the UK’s broken asylum system! According to analysis by the New Statesman, clause nine of the bill could impact up to six million people in Britain – with the majority being ethnic minorities such as those from Black, Asian or Eastern European backgrounds. Clause 9 in the new bill exempts the government from giving notice if it is not “reasonably practicable” to do so, or in the interests of national security, diplomatic relations or is otherwise in the public interest. Under Clause 9 of the Nationality and Borders Bill, the government no longer has to give notice of decision to deprive a person of citizenship if is not “reasonably practicable”. Under international law, everyone has the right to a nationality so people cannot be left stateless. An amendment was tabled by 20 MPs, who sought to scrap the plans in the bill to send people to another country while their asylum claims are processed. The Home Office floated proposals to place asylum seekers offshore in Gibraltar, the Scottish islands and Albania – but all these countries responded with anger and stated that they have no plans to agree to such an arrangement.

A report titled “An inspection of asylum casework” submitted last year by Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration, David Neal tore into Home Secretary Priti Patel’s arguments that appeals to asylum decisions are “a complete merry-go-round and it has been exploited” by immigration lawyers. Alasdair Mackenzie, a barrister who specialises in asylum appeals added that the report “entirely undermines the secretary’s position that the way to deal with the problems in the system is more legislation. What is needed is actually better administration of the system that you’ve got.”
So, what really is all the fuss about? After all its just another major piece of legislation being pushed through parliament by the majority Tory government at Westminster. Covid-19, high unemployment, inflation, health and other issues are being used as a distraction to push thru this bill that will have long-term impact on non-white British citizens.

Terrorism, the refugee and asylum crisis will be used to target individuals that speak out against the government or British state or may be involved overseas in fighting against any injustice that may be construed by the home secretary as being anti British. In this case damaging economic interests of British companies overseas and in conflict hotspots around the world. Four barristers led by the human rights QC Raza Husain claim that the nationality and borders bill, will lead to challenges under international human rights and refugee treaties. Following 95 pages of legal opinion commissioned by the human rights group Freedom From Torture, they conclude: “This bill represents the biggest legal assault on international refugee law ever seen in the UK.

In conclusion this bill if passed will provide any future government/home secretary to decide who is a threat to the UK with no appeals process and the loss of their citizenship. Having acquired my citizenship through all the proper channels, I may now face deportation and the revoking of my citizenship if my columns and social activism upsets local Tories and Unionists. Until that day comes let’s enjoy what little freedoms we all have.

Published in The Peeblesshire News on Friday 21st January 2022

Is Being Vegan the Future?

This week Bosco Santimano founder and executive director of social enterprise You Can Cook, shares his thoughts on veganism in a two-part series.

Its 2022 and here is hoping this year gets better than the previous two years! The first part of this two-part column will focus on what is veganism and why it’s becoming a lifestyle choice for many citizens around the planet. Climate change has not only made us aware of the dangers of pollution and life on this planet via extraction and burning of fossil fuels; but also put our food choices right in the mix too. Since the industrialisation of our food began in true earnest in the 60’s, humankind has been pushing life on earth to its extremes.

So, what is veganism? In a nutshell, a vegan is someone who restricts themselves to a plant-based diet and has no animal ingredients directly or indirectly in their diet. A vegan also makes choices that don’t support the exploitation and cruelty to animals for clothing, cosmetic research or any other purpose and by doing so promotes the development and use of animal free alternatives. Veganism as a term came into existence in 1944 when some members of the British Vegetarian Society wanted a space in their regular newsletter specifically for people who avoided all animal products in diet including eggs and all dairy products. When the request was rejected by the Vegetarian Society, a gentleman named Donald Watson coined the term “Vegan” and created a new quarterly publication whose subscribers included the legendary George Bernard Shaw. Veganism took a long time to grow and become popular and from being a fad and celebrity endorsed diet it is now becoming mainstream and very popular among environmentalist and the health-conscious younger generation who are more in tune with the climate challenges facing the planet.

Readers may also know that a vegetarian is different from a vegan; while a vegetarian will consume milk and milk related products, eggs, honey to name a few but a vegan will not. Latest poll figures show that a third of the UK are interested in becoming vegans! Going vegan will also likely increase your education and your awareness regarding your diet and what’s good for you and what’s not. By learning about proper nutrition, you may be able to increase your health level, which may give you all kinds of advantages in your life and will also likely increase your life expectancy. In our current technological state, it is also rather easy to go vegan compared to centuries ago. Through the internet, you can get plenty of delicious recipes and also some tips on how to avoid mistakes related to veganism. We recently launched our YouTube Recipe channel and every Friday new and exciting recipes will be uploaded which include a good selection of vegan dishes.

Veganism and the related vegan diet have become quite popular over the past decade. People become more aware of their health and many of us also want to avoid supporting the factory farming industry. Going vegan has many important advantages, however, it also implies serious downsides. It is on you to decide whether a vegan diet is the right way to go or not. Before making this decision, make sure to check out all the pros and cons of veganism in order to make a profound decision since it could heavily influence your quality of life as well as your health.

Thus, going vegan is a great way to save our animals, to increase our health levels and to slow down global warming at the same time. Veganism involves the openness to change in order to prevent suffering, the willingness to be creative and to cook healthy tasteful meals. Next month we will look at the pros and cons of being a vegan.

Published in The Peeblesshire News on Friday 7th January 2022